N.H. Preservation Alliance Hosts Online Auction
May
10
to Jun 2

N.H. Preservation Alliance Hosts Online Auction

May is Preservation Month and a good time to help support New Hampshire’s historic resources by participating in the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance’s online auction. Proceeds from the auction will help support Seven to Save endangered properties and old farms and barns across the state.

Link to the auction site:

https://www.biddingforgood.com/auction/auctionhome.action?vhost=nhpreservation&aalias=auction2019.

This year’s online auction will feature tickets to cultural sites and workshops, behind-the-scenes tours, wonderful getaways and valuable preservation services. For example, participants will have an opportunity to bid on a special outing for four at the Castle in the Clouds (pictured at left) — a historic estate in Moultonborough — for a carriage ride, tour and lunch. Or bid on a wonderful evening of dining and lodging at the Horse and Hound Inn in Franconia.

Thanks for your interest in the Preservation Alliance’s online auction. We appreciate your support for the history and heritage of New Hampshire!

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Preservation Conference and Achievement Awards: Littleton, N.H.
May
31
8:30 AM08:30

Preservation Conference and Achievement Awards: Littleton, N.H.

Join the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance for our biennial conference, "Preserving Community Character: Critical Issues and Opportunities,” in Littleton, N.H., a historic North Country village with one of our state's most vibrant downtowns.

The conference offers great opportunities to learn about new preservation strategies and network with other preservation advocates and practitioners. This year’s conference includes the presentation of the 2019 Preservation Achievement Awards.

Register at https://bit.ly/2v3py5a

Recognized experts in historic preservation and community leaders will lead sessions focused on saving and re-purposing community landmarks, preservation tools and techniques, and best practices to effectively make your case through storytelling and fundraising. Participants can join round-table discussions at lunch on topics of their choice.

The day’s events include historic tours of downtown Littleton, with local perspectives on the town’s award-winning Main Street. The conference concludes with a networking reception at the Littleton Community House, a beautifully restored Victorian mansion.

Learn more about the conference and register here: https://bit.ly/2v3py5a

EVENT SPONSORS

Organizational partners supporting this event include:  AIA New Hampshire, Association of Historical Societies of New HampshireAARP NH, Littleton Historical Society, NH Department of Resources and Economic Development, Bureau of Historic Sites, NH Division of Historical Resources, NH Historical Society, Land and Community Heritage Investment Program, NH Municipal Association, Plan New Hampshire, and Stay Work Play NH.

To date, generous sponsors for the preservation conference include the following: Bedard Preservation & Restoration; Fifield Building Restoration & Relocation LLC; Northland Forest Products; The Rowley Agency; Sheehan Phinney; Arch Weathers Historic Sashworks; New Hampshire Conservation and Heritage License Plate Program (Moose Plate); Sash and Solder; and SMP Architecture.

For more information and registration, visit nhpreservation.org or call 603-224-2281.

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Program in New England Studies
Jun
17
to Jun 22

Program in New England Studies

Historic New England presents Program in New England Studies, an intensive week-long exploration of New England decorative arts and architecture from Monday, June 17 to Saturday, June 22, 2019.

At Program in New England Studies you’ll learn about New England culture from the seventeenth century to the Colonial Revival through artifacts and architecture.

Travel throughout New England to hear lectures and presentations by some of the country’s leading experts in regional history, architecture, preservation, and decorative arts. There are workshops, visits to Historic New England properties, other museums, and private homes and collections. Learn about Historic New England’s work to transform the Eustis Estate in Milton, Mass., into a museum and study center; and enjoy a champagne reception on the terrace of Beauport, the Sleeper-McCann House on Gloucester Harbor.

The program is a chance to meet people from all over the country who want to learn more about New England and to hear from the connoisseurs who want to share information about their area of expertise. It is perfect for museum professionals, graduate students, owners of historic houses, board members and volunteers of historic house museums, collectors, and anyone with a passion for New England history.

 For a complete itinerary, registration information, and scholarships details visit: https://www.historicnewengland.org/scholarships-available-for-program-in-new-england-studies/

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Saving the Sash: A Hands-on Window Restoration Workshop
Jun
29
9:00 AM09:00

Saving the Sash: A Hands-on Window Restoration Workshop

Sponsored by the NH Preservation Alliance in partnership with the Exeter Heritage and Conservation Commissions

Where: Conservation Center at Raynes Farm, 61 Newfield Road, Exeter, N.H.
Cost: Preservation Alliance Members $60; non-members $70; Preservation Alliance new-member special: $80 (includes workshop and one-year Alliance membership).
Register: Contact the Preservation Alliance at (603) 224-2281. Space is limited, so sign up now!
Contact: Beverly Thomas, 603-224-2281; bt@nhpreservation.org

Wait! Don't Replace Your Old Windows! This workshop offers practical solutions for wood window restoration.

Do you live in an older house with wood windows that could use a little TLC? 

Join the N.H. Preservation Alliance and the Exeter Heritage and Conservation Commissions at the Raynes Barn in Exeter for a hands-on workshop presented by Jade Mortimer, Heartwood Window Restoration, to learn how to restore your wood windows to their former glory.

Paint removal, glass cutting, glazing, sash rope replacement, weather stripping and storm window choices will be covered. Participants may bring their own sash or use one provided, and will be guided through the necessary steps of a complete wood window restoration that they can then replicate on their own.  If you are interested in learning how to restore the wood windows in your older home, this workshop is not to be missed! All materials and lunch will be provided.

Repairing and re-tuning older wood windows can often be equally or more energy efficient than installing replacement windows, and avoids the problems of landfill disposal and purchase of new products with relatively short life spans. “In addition to being the greener choice, preserving your historic windows is the best choice to retain the architectural character of your home," said Beverly Thomas, Program Director at the Preservation Alliance.

Lead sponsors of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance’s Old House & Barn Program include: Bedard Preservation & Restoration, LLC; Fifield Building Restoration & Relocation; Ian Blackman LLC, Restoration & Preservation; and TMS Architects, PA.

And additional sponsors include: Crown Point Cabinetry; Hubbingtons; Levasseur Electrical Contractors; and Brooks Post & Beam, Inc.; Cedar Mill Group, Inc.; Decatur Co.; Fisher Engineering, P.C.; Frank Anazalone Associates; Garland Mill Timberframe; Harrisville Design; JLT Painting; Millrace Builders, LLC; Samyn-D’Elia Architects, P.A.; Selectwood; Steppingstone Masonry; The H.L. Turner Group; and The Lumber Barn.

The Preservation Alliance supports and encourages the revitalization and protection of historic buildings and places, which strengthens communities and local economies.

Established in 1965, the Exeter Conservation Commission manages over 2,800 acres of conservation lands in town, including Raynes Farm, with the goal of cultural and natural resource protection.  The 50-acre property and barn at Raynes Farm was acquired in 2002 with support of town voters and a grant from Land & Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP).

The Exeter Heritage Commission, established by town vote in 2006, serves as a valuable resource to guide manage, recognize, and protect and educate residents about historical and cultural resources. 

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Big House, Little House, Back  House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England
Jul
17
6:00 PM18:00

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England

Barrington Public Library

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat. 

Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His other publications include Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish CommunityHouses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses.

His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/people.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities.

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Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England
Jul
18
3:00 PM15:00

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England

North Hampton Town Hall

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat. 

Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His other publications include Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish CommunityHouses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses.

His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/people.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities.

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Big House, LIttle House, Back  House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England
Jul
21
1:00 PM13:00

Big House, LIttle House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England

Jefferson Town Hall

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat. 

Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His other publications include Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish CommunityHouses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses.

His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/people.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities.

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Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England
Jul
24
7:00 PM19:00

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England

Lake Winnipesaukee Museum, Laconia

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat. 

Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His other publications include Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish CommunityHouses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses.

His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/people.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities.

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Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England
Jul
25
6:30 PM18:30

Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm buildings of New England

Kimball Public Library, Atkinson

Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat. 

Thomas Hubka earned his Bachelor's in Architecture from Carnegie-Mellon University and Master's from the University of Oregon. His other publications include Resplendent Synagogue: Architecture and Worship in an 18th Century Polish CommunityHouses without Names: Architecture Nomenclature and the Classification of America's Common Houses.

His forthcoming book is entitled The Transformation of Working-Class Houses and Domesticity, 1890-1940: Improved Homes for a New Middle Class. Hubka's research primarily interprets the historic development and relationships between architecture/buildings and culture/people.

This event is free and open to the public and sponsored by the New Hampshire Humanities.

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Introduction to Woodworking Hand Tools
Sep
13
8:00 AM08:00

Introduction to Woodworking Hand Tools

Workshop held at Sanborn Mills Farm in Loudon, N.H.

All successful woodworking starts with a good working knowledge of hand tools. In this one-day workshop at Sanborn Mills Farm, students will learn how to sharpen wood working tools and how to use them safely.  We will work with the basics – hand saws, chisels and planes.

Workshop fee:  $125.00 includes materials and lunch featuring our farm-grown food.
Instructor: Kevin A. Schurman with Emma Woodward and Jake Farmer
Workshop Size:  This workshop can accommodate up to 4 people; minimum of 3 students needed to be held.

Click here to register for a workshop & read over our policies.

To learn more about our instructors, click here .

 If you are traveling from afar and would like to learn about housing at Sanborn Mills Farm, click here .  If you decide you would like to stay at the farm after registering, please contact the office at 603-435-7314 weekdays between the hours of 9 am and 3 pm to check on availability.

 

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Traditional Sash Window Making Workshop
Sep
14
8:00 AM08:00

Traditional Sash Window Making Workshop

Workshop held at Sanborn Mills Farm in Loudon, N.H.

People have always sought to light and air into a house.  The earliest openings were covered in animal skin and translucent stone. Until the advent of large glass manufacturing, windows were made with small panes of glass set into a framework – generally called sash windows.  Though many windows for homes are now double layers of glass, single-paned sash windows are still needed for all kinds of structures

In this workshop, students will make a 4-paned sash window using traditional hand tools.

 If you are traveling from afar and would like to learn about housing at Sanborn Mills Farm, click here . 

 If you decide you would like to stay at the farm after registering, please contact the office at 603-435-7314 weekdays between 9 am and 3 pm to check on availability.

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15th Annual Hooksett Heritage Day
May
18
10:00 AM10:00

15th Annual Hooksett Heritage Day

In celebration of Preservation Month, the Heritage Commission, Head School Society, and Historical Society will cosponsor the 15th Annual Hooksett Heritage Day. 

The Heritage Commission will host a program on Hooksett’s town cemeteries at Head Cemetery on Pleasant Street starting at 10 a.m.  Mike Horne, chair of the Hooksett Cemetery Commission, will talk about our cemeteries, past and present.

 After the Cemetery Commission program, Mackenzie Conner, a candidate for a Girl Scout Gold Award, will be debuting her project–a walking tour of Head Cemetery.  Wear comfortable shoes.

The schoolmarms of the Head School Society will be at the school till 12:30 p.m. to show guests around and answer any questions they may have.

If you’ve never had a chance to visit the Arah W. Prescott Historical Library (in front of the Old Town Hall), stop by any time between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. and browse around.  There are lots of great photos, objects, and memorabilia.  You’re sure to learn something you didn’t know before.

As a special treat, thanks to the current owner of the circa 1794 Prescott Tavern (junction of 3A and Pine Street), visitors from noon to 3 p.m. will be allowed to tour the tavern/inn.  In the early days, guests could buy dinner for 20 cents and those wishing to imbibe could get as many glasses of rum as they wished for 3 cents each.  No dinner or rum on the 18th, but guests can view an example of conceptual plans showing the site’s possibilities.

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Managing Municipal, Museum, and Other Non-Profit Historic Properties
May
10
9:00 AM09:00

Managing Municipal, Museum, and Other Non-Profit Historic Properties

Leading Locally: Non-Profit and Preservation Management Strategies for Historic Properties

Join staff from Historic New England and other expert professionals for the second of three Leading Locallyworkshops on issues related to managing museum, non-profit, and municipally owned historic properties.

Managing historic buildings owned by municipalities, non-profits, and small museums presents numerous challenges. In this installment of the series, explore funding mechanisms; zoning, planning, and code regulations that affect historic properties; and treatment approaches to maintaining historic buildings. Learn from preservation professionals who manage historic sites and make treatment decisions, including reviews of condition assessments, cyclical maintenance, disaster preparedness, and working with contractors.

Workshop location: Haverhill Regional Office, 151 Essex Street, Haverhill, Mass.

Workshop fee: $30 non-members; $25 for Historic New England member. Box lunch and beverages provided.

Register at HistoricNewEngland.org or call 617-994-6644 for more information.

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Caring for Museum and Historic Buildings: Their Structures, Finishes, and Contents
May
3
9:00 AM09:00

Caring for Museum and Historic Buildings: Their Structures, Finishes, and Contents

Leading Locally: Non-Profit and Preservation Management Strategies for Historic Properties

Join staff from Historic New England and other expert professionals for the first of three Leading Locally workshops on issues related to managing museum, non-profit, and municipally owned historic properties.

Held at the Historic New England’s Haverhill Regional Office, this workshop focuses on conservation, care, and cleaning standards and methods related to small museums and historic houses. Learn from collections professionals about maintenance and cleaning of historic interiors, new approaches to integrated pest management, and conservation treatments for common objects. Includes a tour of collections storage and hands-on training stations.

Workshop location: Haverhill Regional Office, 151 Essex Street, Haverhill, Mass.

Workshop fee: $30 non-members; $25 for Historic New England member. Box lunch and beverages provided.

Register at HistoricNewEngland.org or call 617-994-6644 for more information.

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The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards: Treatment Considerations
May
1
to May 2

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards: Treatment Considerations

The National Preservation Institute hosts this in-depth workshop with John Cullinane, AIA in Montpelier, VT.

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties form the basis for historic property rehabilitation for all federal undertakings, for federal tax benefits, and often for state, local, and private projects. Explore the standards in detail with particular attention to the preservation of historic fabric, sustainable strategies, energy conservation, accessibility considerations, health and safety codes, security issues, and climate change. Participants have the opportunity to discuss the application of the Standards to their projects.

Registration costs $300 (students)-$600, but scholarships are available. For more information: https://npi.org/sem-stand.html

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Enfield Shaker Museum Spring Shaker Forum
Apr
26
to Apr 28

Enfield Shaker Museum Spring Shaker Forum

A weekend of lectures by Shaker scholars, tours of the Museum, special activities, updates on preservation projects, networking with colleagues and friends, lodging and meals in the Great Stone Dwelling and special presentations on Friday and Saturday evenings.

To register or receive an electronic copy of the full program/registration form, please call the Museum at (603) 632-4346 or email education@shakermuseum.org.

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Researching Your Old House
Apr
11
7:00 PM19:00

Researching Your Old House

Every house has a history, but how do you discover yours? Join the NH Preservation Alliance’s Andrew Cushing  as he explores tools, tricks, and tips for researching your old house. Using a combination of sources – common and uncommon – anyone can start to assemble a fuller history of their house’s history.

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Strong Towns: Transportation in the Next American City
Apr
3
6:30 PM18:30

Strong Towns: Transportation in the Next American City

What does it mean to be a Strong Town? Chuck Marohn, the Founder and President of Strong Towns, will present on Wednesday, April 3 at 6:30 PM at the Portsmouth Public Library.

Mr. Marohn is a Professional Engineer (PE) licensed in the State of Minnesota and a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP).

THE PROBLEM WE FACE

For generations, North American communities have been growing—or at least, they’ve been building. But as we’ve paved endless roads, raised countless buildings and put more and more infrastructure in the ground, we’ve given almost no thought to whether future generations will be able to afford to maintain the world we’ll leave them — or how many of the things we build are making our communities worse places to live today.

THE STRONG TOWNS APPROACH

The Strong Towns approach is a radically new way of thinking about the way we build our world. We believe that in order to truly thrive, our cities and towns must:

• Stop valuing efficiency and start valuing resilience;

• Stop betting our futures on huge, irreversible projects, and
start taking small, incremental steps;

• Stop fearing change and start embracing a process of
continuous adaptation;

• Stop building our world based on abstract theories, and start
building it based on how our places actually work and what our
neighbors actually need today;

• Stop obsessing about future growth and start obsessing about
our current finances.

RSVP

We will reserve ample time for questions and discussion. The event is free and all are welcome. Please register here to help ensure sufficient seating.

Event Sponsors: Piscataqua Savings Bank, Rosamond Thaxter Foundation, Piscataqua Garden Club, and the Geoffrey E. Clark and Martha Fuller Clark Fund of the NH Charitable Foundation.

Event Partners: Seacoast Media Group, PortsmouthNH.com, Coruway Film Institute, Sailmaker House, and Workforce Housing Coalition of the Greater Seacoast. 

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Researching Your Old House
Mar
7
6:30 PM18:30

Researching Your Old House

Every house has a history, but how do you discover yours? Join the NH Preservation Alliance’s Andrew Cushing  as he explores tools, tricks, and tips for researching your old house. Using a combination of sources – common and uncommon – anyone can start to assemble a fuller history of their house’s history.

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The Clock Watching Over Us: Historic Preservation of New England's Tower Clocks
Mar
3
2:00 PM14:00

The Clock Watching Over Us: Historic Preservation of New England's Tower Clocks

2 pm - Music from the Woods peforms Fiddle & Guitar

2:30 to 3:30 pm - Presentation by Phil D’Avanza with Q&A following

Tower and church clocks have watched over our communities for generations and serve as focal points for town centers. These clock mechanisms may be rarely seen, but are appreciated by those who have the opportunity to explore their design and history. Discover the skill and passion required to keep these fascinating time machines working and learn what the future holds for their preservation.

Philip D'Avanza repairs and preserves antique clocks of all makes and sizes and specializes in tower clock repair in historic structures throughout New England.

Renowned fiddler James Pero and guitarist Stan Arthur are known as the group Music from the Woods.

SNOW DATE IS MARCH 10th.

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The Old House Speaks, or Researching Historic Homes in NH Workshop
Feb
23
1:00 PM13:00

The Old House Speaks, or Researching Historic Homes in NH Workshop

  • New Hampshire Historical Society (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Ever wonder about the history of your house and the people who lived there? This practical workshop helps researchers learn more about historic structures in New Hampshire, particularly the old homes that still stand in every Granite State community. Presenters Bill Veillette (executive director of the Northeast Document Conservation Center) and James L. Garvin (retired state architectural historian) demonstrate the variety of resources available to learn about New Hampshire houses, provide tips on how to approach research, and offer examples of how to “connect the dots” to create a compelling story of a historic house and its occupants, including deciphering the architectural clues found in every old house about the nature of its construction and the details of its physical features. This workshop is offered in association with the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance.

The cost is $35 for New Hampshire Historical Society members or members of the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance and $50 for nonmembers. Register online at Eventbrite.com, mail in the registration form, or call 603-856-0621 to register by phone and pay with a credit card.

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"Life & Death in the Piscataqua Region" Annual Symposium
Feb
9
10:00 AM10:00

"Life & Death in the Piscataqua Region" Annual Symposium

  • St. John's Lodge Masonic Temple (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join Portsmouth Historic Sites Associates for the "Life & Death in the Piscataqua Region" Annual Symposium Saturday, February 9th, 10 am to 3 pm at St. John's Lodge Masonic Temple.

Topics Include:

  • Rodney Rowland, Strawbery Banke Director of Special Projects & Facilities, "Water Has a Memory: The Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Cultural Resources.”

  • Carolyn Roy, Warner House Board of Governors, Preview of Warner House 2019 Exhibit, “From the Mundane to the Sublime: Stoneware 1600-1775”

  • Gerald W.R. Ward, Consulting Curator and Editor of the Portsmouth Marine Society Press, Portsmouth Historical Society, "New Hampshire Folk Art:  An Exhibition Preview"

  • Barbara Ward, Director/Curator, Moffatt-Ladd House, "The 1779 Petition of Freedom Initiative"

  • Brian Burford, Director/State Archivist, NH Archives, "Treasures of the State"

The annual event, a fund-raiser for the Portsmouth Historic Sites, will also include raffle baskets and the sale of additional items from PHHA members.

Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Click here and save $5 by purchasing tickets in advance.
Ticket includes continental breakfast, lunch of homemade soup and five illustrated talks.

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Unearthing the Clues at the Burnham Garrison
Jan
26
1:00 PM13:00

Unearthing the Clues at the Burnham Garrison

  • Durham Town Hall Council Chambers (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Durham Historic Association will host "Unearthing the Clues at the Burnham Garrison" on Saturday, January 26th at 1 p.m. in the Durham Town Hall Council Chambers.  

How did residents of the Oyster River Plantation live during the 1600’s and what articles did they use in their homes?  Archaeologist Meghan Howey will share some surprising discoveries about life in Durham more than three centuries ago.  Professor Howey and her crew have been surveying the Burnham Garrison site, one of the fortified houses on the Oyster River that withstood many attacks, including the French and Indian attack of 1694.

Refreshments will be served.  Snow date is Sunday, January 27th.  

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39th Annual Candlelight Stroll
Dec
15
to Dec 22

39th Annual Candlelight Stroll

December 15, 16 & 22, 2018
Saturdays, 5-9 pm. Sundays, 4-8 pm.

Candlelight Stroll, an annual holiday tradition at Strawbery Banke showcases 350 years of seasonal and holiday traditions against the backdrop of the Museum’s furnished historic houses. On these weekend evenings, the Museum grounds glow with hundreds of lighted candle lanterns, the houses are adorned with thousands of hand-made decorations crafted from live greens and dried flowers and herbs collected from the Museum gardens, and the air is filled with the sound of holiday music and scent of woodsmoke from the bonfire.

Visitors stroll from house to historic house, greeted by costumed role players and performers who recreate the traditions of times past, rediscovering the joys of simpler times. Carolers, chestnuts and holiday crafts bring all the sounds, scents and moments for family 'stopfulness' to this event that is a cherished New Hampshire tradition.  

Complimentary refreshments and hot apple cider are offered at the Cider Shed. Traditional hearth-cooking demonstrations, crafts demonstrations, and winter projects for kids provide interactive fun for multiple generations.

Tickets are $25/adults, $12.50/children (ages 5-17), and $60/family (covers 2 adults + 2 children age 5-17). Children under 5, free. Active duty military and their families, and veterans, free.

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Christmas at Canterbury
Dec
15
3:00 PM15:00

Christmas at Canterbury

Christmas at Canterbury is a chance to experience the delights of Christmas in a simpler era. Join us inside the historic Shaker buildings to watch an old-time 19th Century magic show, meet Father Christmas, make Christmas-inspired crafts, admire a toy train display or listen to fiddlers. Enjoy hot cider and singing Christmas carols as we light the Village Christmas tree. This classic holiday event is a family favorite

Cost: $18 for adults, $8 for children 6-17, under 5 free. Members half priced.

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Canterbury Shaker Village Candlelit Tours
Dec
13
to Dec 14

Canterbury Shaker Village Candlelit Tours

  • Canterbury Shaker Village (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Visit Canterbury Shaker Village for a guided candlelit tour highlighting the Shakers’ Christmas traditions. During the 200 years that Shakers lived at Canterbury Shaker Village their Christmas traditions evolved and changed. Explore the evolution of the Shakers’ Christmas celebrations – from simple religious services in the 19th century to holiday decorations and elaborate theatricals in the 20th century – on this 60 minute guided tour, which ends with cookies and hot cider in one of our decorated historic buildings.

Dates: December  13th & 14th

Times: Tours start at 6:30pm & 7:00pm

Tickets: $12 for adults, $6 for children ages 6-17, Village members half price. Suggested for ages 12+. Advance registration required. Tour size limited to 15 people to ensure an intimate experience. Please click here to register. Tickets will be sold up to 24 hours before the tours begin.

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Researching Your Old House
Nov
13
6:00 PM18:00

Researching Your Old House

Every house has a history, but how do you discover yours? Join the NH Preservation Alliance’s Andrew Cushing  as he explores tools, tricks, and tips for researching your old house. Using a combination of sources – common and uncommon – anyone can start to assemble a fuller history of their house’s history.

View Event →
Timber Framing Workshop
Oct
27
9:00 AM09:00

Timber Framing Workshop

Join local timber framer Tim Baker at Enfield Shaker Village for a second session on timber framing and the joinery techniques used in historic Shaker buildings. Build on your work from the first session or start with the fundamentals while you try your hand at the layout and cutting of mortise-and-tenon joints and carving wooden pegs. The proper use of hand tools to cut joinery and tool sharpening will also be covered. Participants will have an opportunity to work on the restoration of a timber frame in a Shaker building on site.  All tools and materials will be supplied. Please bring a bag lunch. The workshop will meet on the back porch of the Great Stone Dwelling.

Cost: $75 per person. $68 for members. Class size limited to 10 so register early!

For more information or to register, call the Museum at (603) 632-4346 or email the Museum at education@shakermuseum.org

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Howard Mansfield: The Habit of Turning the World Upside Down
Oct
24
5:30 PM17:30

Howard Mansfield: The Habit of Turning the World Upside Down

Join Howard Mansfield at Gibson’s Bookstore Wednesday night as he discusses his new book The Habit of Turning the World Upside Down. He writes about architecture, preservation, and history in his quest to understand the soul of American places.

“During the past few years, while reporting on citizens fighting natural gas pipelines and transmission towers planned to cut right across their homes, I saw the emotional toll of these projects. They got under the skin. This was about more than kilowatts, powerlines, and pipelines. Something in this upheaval felt familiar. I began to realize that I was witnessing an essential American experience: the world turned upside down. And it all turned on one word: property”

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Wet Basements: Causes, Effects, and Solutions to a Common Old House Problem
Oct
20
9:00 AM09:00

Wet Basements: Causes, Effects, and Solutions to a Common Old House Problem

Old Houses often struggle with musty, excessively humid and wet basements that can lead to unhealthy living conditions and expensive house repairs.

Join Beverly Thomas, Program Director at the NH Preservation Alliance, Rodney Rowland, Director of Facilities and Special Projects at Strawbery Banke, Don Woods, Woods & Co. Civil Engineering, and Steve Bedard of Bedard Preservation & Restoration as they cover everything from basic practical tips to more technical solutions to preventing water infiltration and high humidity levels in your basement. Learn how proper grade, vapor barriers, perimeter drains, swales, sump pumps, and dehumidifiers can be used to improve the environment of old house basements.

Following the presentation participants will have the opportunity to explore the basements of four museum houses, discuss the water mitigation efforts that have been applied, and observe how the recent increase in cyclical ground water levels has affected their results.

Registration is required. Please call the Preservation Alliance to register, (603) 224-2281.

$15 for Preservation Alliance and Strawberry Banke Members. Non-members $20. Preservation Alliance New-member Special $35 (includes program fee and a 1-year Alliance membership). WALK-INS WELCOME.

Photo courtesy of Rodney Rowland, Strawbery Banke Museum

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Ghosts and Haunted Houses
Oct
17
7:00 PM19:00

Ghosts and Haunted Houses

GHOSTS and the paranormal—For the past 15 years, Kelly Rogers has been investigating haunted sites in the area. In her presentation, she’ll demonstrate some investigative equipment and talk about specific sites in the area. Her goal is to investigate, resolve, comfort and educate people about this often felt and sometimes seen spirit world.

DO YOU HAVE A HAUNTING STORY? Kelly wants to hear your stories or will answer questions of hauntings in your house, neighborhood or area.

This program will be educational, exciting, fun and, maybe, a little spine tingling! Please join us for a look into the paranormal as we get into the season of ghosts and goblins!

Hosted by the Bartlett Historical Society. Questions? Call Norman Head @ 603-986-6278

To offset presentation costs, donations are gratefully accepted at the door.

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‘A Neat Assortment of Paper Hangings’: 18th Century Wallpapers in the Piscataqua Region
Oct
16
5:30 PM17:30

‘A Neat Assortment of Paper Hangings’: 18th Century Wallpapers in the Piscataqua Region

  • Strawbery Banke Museum’s Tyco Visitor Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Portsmouth is fortunate to have several houses where expensive English flock wallpapers from the 18th century remain on the walls. Fragments of other flocked patterns have been found over the years, including two recently discovered in the Moffatt-Ladd House. This lecture will discuss these discoveries, as well as the other types of wallpaper patterns that were used to embellish Portsmouth’s handsome architecture and provide a backdrop for its stylish furniture.

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2018 Seven to Save Announcement
Oct
16
3:30 PM15:30

2018 Seven to Save Announcement

Join us when we announce 2018's listees to our Seven to Save program. 

Our host site this year is Washington, home of the 1787 Washington Meetinghouse, which has undergone a $1.4 M rehabilitation since being listed in 2014. The evening will include the announcement, followed by refreshments, and updates on previous Seven to Save properties. 

Between 3:30 and 5pm, we also encourage you to tour local landmarks, including:

Shedd Free Library, Gibson Pewter, the 1787 Meetinghouse, and the Historical Society barn (which won a Preservation Achievement Award in 2006). Maps and more information will be available at registration.

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Hooksett celebrates NH History Week
Oct
9
to Oct 25

Hooksett celebrates NH History Week

Three great events in Hooksett in October:

The Heritage Commission will celebrate the story of NH’s State Veterans Cemetery, a hidden treasure in the town of Boscawen, with the showing of the documentary “A Living Memorial - NH State Veterans Cemetery,” at the Hooksett Public Library in the Village Depot Room (downstairs) at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, October 9, 2018.  The documentary shows the pristine grounds and serene setting which make the cemetery a place of great pride for NH veterans and their families.  The story of the cemetery is told through poignant interviews of the creators, the builders, the managers and most particularly, through the personal experience of one Gold Star family.  Participating in the program that evening will be Hooksett resident, Dave Kenney, the Executive Producer of the documentary, and Mike Horne, also from Hooksett, the Director of the NH State Veterans Cemetery and the Chair of the Hooksett Cemetery Commission.

At 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 10, the Head Society schoolmarms (Ginger Saunders and Jackie Wood) will be presenting a typical 1840s lesson at the Head School, 16 Pleasant Street.  The Massabesic Seniors group from Auburn will be attending, but there are a few more spaces available.  If anyone would like to attend a class tailored to adult scholars, please call Ginger Saunders at 887-0031 to make a reservation.  Suggested donation is $3.  You might want to check this program out for a future booking by your own club or organization.

On Thursday, October 25, at 6:30 p.m. at the Hooksett Library, the Historical Society will feature The Photography of Ernie Gould--Pictures from Hooksett's Past.  Mr. Gould was a local photographer and civic-minded resident, recognized as 1985's Citizen of the Year.  He was his ship’s photographer in WW II and later worked as the official photographer for the NH Fish and Game Department, the Manchester Historic Association, and Hooksett’s Historical Society.  He also did photographic work for several of the largest architectural and engineering firms in the area.  A meeting of the Historical Society will precede the program.

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Leading Locally: Design Review For Preservation Planning
Sep
21
to Sep 22

Leading Locally: Design Review For Preservation Planning

Historic New England partners with the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation to present a two-day workshop on design review for preservation planning. Historic district and design review commission members, local planners, students, and advocates for historic preservation learn how to plan for preserving neighborhoods, downtowns, and village centers using design review bylaws. 

The workshop features lectures by experts from across New England. Learn how to apply the Secretary of the Interior's Treatment Standards and develop design guidelines. Use those standards and guidelines in field exercises on specific preservation projects in White River Junction, Vermont. The workshop culminates in a mock public hearing session that puts lessons learned into practice.

$20

Registration required. Call 802-989-4723 or 617-994-6644 for more information, or register online.

A limited number of discounted rooms will be available at the Hotel Coolidge. To reserve, call 800-622-1124.

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Researching Your Old House
Sep
20
6:30 PM18:30

Researching Your Old House

Every house has a history, but how do you discover yours? Join the NH Preservation Alliance’s Andrew Cushing  as he explores tools, tricks, and tips for researching your old house. Using a combination of sources – common and uncommon – anyone can start to assemble a fuller history of their house’s history.

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Eric T. Huddleston, New Hampshire's Architect
Sep
18
5:30 PM17:30

Eric T. Huddleston, New Hampshire's Architect

  • Strawbery Banke Museum’s Tyco Visitor Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Peter Michaud, former National  Register & Preservation Tax Incentives Coordinator at the NH Division of Historical Resources will give a talk on architect Eric T. Huddleston. 

Huddleston was influential in creating a master plan for the University of New Hampshire campus as well as designing many of its iconic buildings. Peter Michaud will explore Huddleston’s influence as an architect beyond his work at UNH by exploring the work of his private firm, as well as the work of the architects he trained.

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Asserting Freedom: A Tour of Cellar Holes & Sites in Hancock, NH
Sep
9
10:00 AM10:00

Asserting Freedom: A Tour of Cellar Holes & Sites in Hancock, NH

Hancock, a quintessential New England village, defies the march of time. At first glance, this little village seems to be slumbering away quite peacefully. However, buried just beneath the Colonial veneer of this seemingly all-white town is a vibrant history of early Black settlers who worked, bought land, built homes, challenged the church and struggled for freedom. Today, all that is left are the abandoned artifacts of that early life: their roads, their walls, their cellar holes and their scant records.

Hear about the anti-slavery riot that occurred in Hancock. Discover the stories of Jack Ware a former enslaved man and members of the Due family and hear how Hanna Due defied the church on this part-walking/part-driving tour with Eric Aldrich as you explore the holes their homes left behind. Eric will also have original documents for you to see. 

$25 per person

 

Important Notes for this tour:

  1. Maximum people for this tour is 25.
  2. This is a part driving part walking tour.
  3. A bus will meet you at the Town Office in Hancock.
  4. Town Office Building at 50 Main St, in Hancock.
  5. Parking is available behind the Town Office.
  6. Please wear sensible walking shoes for this tour. No heels or sandals. You will have a 1/2 mile walk to see old cellar holes.


 

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Jackson Hill Cider Day
Sep
8
11:00 AM11:00

Jackson Hill Cider Day

The historic orchard at Jackson House (c. 1664) comes alive with children's games, crafts, and seasonal refreshments during this early fall festival. Help grind apples and press cider. Watch artisans demonstrate their craft. Tour the oldest house in northern New England. Received 2018 Preservation Award from New Hampshire Preservation Alliance. Animals from Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm make their yearly visit to the house. Special performances by New Hampshire Theatre Project and New England Irish Harp Orchestra. 

Free to Historic New England members
$6 nonmembers
$3 nonmember children 

Please call 603-436-3205 or buy tickets online.

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