LCHIP

2019 Preservation Achievement Award: Berlin and Coos County Historical Society

The Historical Society owns and is completing the rehabilitation of these two barns located north of downtown. The barns are the last of what remains of Brown Company Logging, and one of the buildings has connections to a Brown family member’s efforts to introduce Arabian horses as a superior breed for the Calvary. (Photo courtesy of Berlin & Coos County Historical Society.)

The Historical Society owns and is completing the rehabilitation of these two barns located north of downtown. The barns are the last of what remains of Brown Company Logging, and one of the buildings has connections to a Brown family member’s efforts to introduce Arabian horses as a superior breed for the Calvary. (Photo courtesy of Berlin & Coos County Historical Society.)

The Berlin & Coos County Historical Society is an extraordinary organization charged with educating a broad and diverse public about Coos County’s rich history, culture and ethnic roots with an eye to showing their significance to our lives today. In support of this mission, the society collects, preserves and displays materials pertaining to Coos County in general and Berlin in particular and they tackle the stewardship of their own 1890 museum headquarters and enormous barns associated with the Brown Company, a prominent pulp and paper-making company also known for many innovations and patents.

The Society was founded in 1990 and has been headquartered in the Moffett House Museum and Genealogy Center since 1996. The cellar contains the restored office and treatment center of Dr. Irving Moffett who was an Osteopath beginning in 1932 and practiced in this location from 1949 until his death in 1993. This building is the repository for about 2500 historical objects, 1612 photographs, and 3004 binders of ephemera. It also contains the largest library of genealogical material north of Manchester. They have also digitized and indexed every Brown Company Bulletin—newsletters that chronicle the lives of mill workers between 1919 and 1960.

The Historical Society also owns and is completing the rehabilitation of two Brown Company Barns north of downtown. These barns are the last of what remains of Brown Company Logging, and one has connections to a Brown family member’s efforts to introduce Arabian horses as a superior breed for the Calvary. Donations from people near and far, 2 LCHIP grants and thousands of hours of labor have been donated to the rehabilitation and stewardship project to date.

The building was jacked up and the rotten wooden supports replaced. Cables on the inside had to be adjusted to make the building square and level. A screen was placed around the bottom of the building to provide ventilation and to keep out animals. The building was given three coats of paint by D&M Painting of Gorham.

For five weeks during the hot summer months of July and August 2010, Maurice Lavertue and Don LeClerc continued the work of restoring the Brown Company Barns on East Side River Road. The sills on the southern-most barn were rotting, causing the exterior walls to sag as much as 8 inches on the north side. As a result, the interior support structure was pushing up into the roof. Don and Maurice jacked up the north side of the 160 year old barn and removed the rotted sill. They poured four new concrete piers, put in a new sill and lowered the wall back onto the new piers.

Thanks to this active and ambitious historical society, Berlin’s history - both architectural and ephemeral - will remain for future generations.

 

Speak Up For Increasing LCHIP Grant-making and More Help for Community Projects: Legislators support SB74 in Senate and first steps of House process

We hope you'll help us support a legislative proposal led by Senator Martha Fuller Clark to increase funding for the Land and Community Heritage Investment Program. The proposal adds $10 to certain deed recording fees, and is projected to add about $1.5 million a year to a level that has been at about $3.5-4 million/year.  As you may know first-hand, demand far exceeds available funds, and historic preservation activity supports jobs, enhances tax base and serves as a catalyst for additional community development activity. 

The Preservation Alliance is very appreciative of strong support of this proposal from Senators representing communities across the state as well as members of the House Committee on Resources, Recreation and Development. After passing the House on May 2, the bill proceeds to the Ways and Means committee of the House. Representatives from local projects in need as well as statewide organizations like the Preservation Alliance, the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests and The Nature Conservancy are in strong support of the bill.

  • The Preservation Alliance has worked with legislators and conservation partners to develop and build the impact of LCHIP over time on the state’s natural and historic resources. Click here to see all past LCHIP projects listed by Town.

  • Since 2000, LCHIP matching grants have preserved or revitalized 223 historic structures and protected over 283,000 acres of important natural resources.  For every $1 of grant funds invested in a project, the community raises almost $6 from other sources to match it. That far exceeds the 50% required level of match.

  • Between 2001 and 2017 $46.9 million of state money through LCHIP has led to a total investment in projects of over $316 million. Bringing all that new money into communities strengthens the local economy.

  • Over the last 10 years, 177 out of the 505 total applications received were not funded.  That figure indicates the demand and need for LCHIP continues, even 18 years after the Legislature established the program.

  • The Land and Community Heritage Commission that recommended the creation of LCHIP in 1999 determined a funding level of $12 million per year was needed to have a meaningful program. This amount has never been available. Demand for funding continues to exceed the amount available.

Here are some ways you can help:

Talk to your representative about the benefits of LCHIP. Offer examples in your community.

Thank members of the House Committee on Resources, Recreation and Development. Link to members and contact info here: http://gencourt.state.nh.us/house/committees/links.aspx?x=3&id=13

Let us know if you have questions? Email projects@nhpreservation.org.

Many more community landmarks are in need of seed monies from LCHIP that will be a catalyst for additional fundraising and community development benefits. The tiny town of Acworth leveraged LCHIP grants to achieve a national award-winning rehab while supporting many local tradespeople.

Many more community landmarks are in need of seed monies from LCHIP that will be a catalyst for additional fundraising and community development benefits. The tiny town of Acworth leveraged LCHIP grants to achieve a national award-winning rehab while supporting many local tradespeople.

LCHIP Grants Millions to Preservation Projects

Today, the Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) granted nearly $4 million in matching dollars to land conservation and historic preservation projects across the state.

Of the 26 historic resources and 16 natural resources receiving grant money, five are Seven to Save properties, one received a $500 mini grant/planning study from us, one received a barn grant assessment, and eight received planning studies through our conditions assessment block grant (also funded by LCHIP, and also to be funded in 2019). We also coached seven successful projects through our field service program.

Planning Studies

This year, six properties received planning study grants from LCHIP. These grants allow for in-depth examinations of buildings, including mechanical systems, structural analyses, and condition assessments. Recipients include Chesterfield Historical Society’s Stone House Tavern, Great North Woods Committee for the Arts’ Former Shrine of Our Lady of Grace in Columbia, Fitwilliam Town Hall, Langdon Congregational Church, Tilton School Library/Mansion, and the NH Preservation Alliance (to redistribute as block grants for smaller assessments).

Of these, the Preservation Alliance was happy to assist in Chesterfield, Columbia, and Langdon.

Seven to Saves

Belmont’s Gale School (2017) will receive a $110,000 grant to help relocate the historic 1894 school threatened with demolition. 2018 listee, Turning Mill Pond at Canterbury Shaker Village, received a $97,339 grant to help repair a dam located within the cultural landscape of the National Historic Landmark district. Kimball-Jenkins Estate in Concord (2013 Seven to Save) will restore the mansion, with help from a $202,000 grant. In Alstead, Chase’s Mill received a second grant, this time for $150,000 to repair the exterior envelope of the building, including windows.

On the Natural Resource side, family farms (2014 Seven to Save) were represented by Farmington’s Scruton Dairy Farm - a fifth generation dairy farm that also received a barn assessment grant from the Alliance in 2015.

Planning Studies Yield Success Stories

Eight projects that received earlier planning studies through the NH Preservation Alliance will now see rehabilitation.

Those include Alstead’s Chase’s Mill; Farmington First Congregational Church (storm windows); Goshen Grange Hall (rehabilitation into town and SAU office space); Centennial Hall in North Hampton (rehabilitation of 2nd floor space); Plymouth’s Old Webster Court House (windows and basement improvements); Portsmouth Women’s Club (installation of sprinkler system); St. Matthew’s Chapel in Sugar Hill (foundation construction); and Whitcomb Hall in Swanzey (2nd floor rehabilitation).

Congratulations also to the following projects: Charlestown’s Silsby Free Library, Ladd-Gilman House in Exeter, Keene’s Ball Mansion (home of the Cheshire County Historical Society), Lebanon’s Kendrick-Wood House (home to the Upper Valley Music Center), Milton Free Library, Ingalls Memorial Library in Rindge, Rochester Opera House, and the Wolfeboro Freight Shed.

Since its incorporation in 2000, LCHIP has awarded over $43 million and protected over 257 historic buildings and conserved over 280,000 acres of land in a total of 157 communities. This investment - which now comes from a deed surcharge at the county level - has leveraged nearly $300 million in the program’s history.

The next LCHIP grant round opens in May 2019. If you are interested in creating a successful preservation project (that may or may not include LCHIP funding), please reach out to Andrew Cushing at the Preservation Alliance (ac@nhpreservation.org or 224-2281).

LCHIP Awards $3.6M to NH Projects

The Col. Brown House in Haverhill Corner received one of 29 historic preservation project grants across the state this LCHIP grant round. The $150,000 grant to project leaders, Haverhill Heritage, will be used for acquistion and repair; it follows an assessment grant from the Preservation Alliance earlier this year.

The Col. Brown House in Haverhill Corner received one of 29 historic preservation project grants across the state this LCHIP grant round. The $150,000 grant to project leaders, Haverhill Heritage, will be used for acquistion and repair; it follows an assessment grant from the Preservation Alliance earlier this year.

The N.H. Preservation Alliance has received a $50,000 block grant award from the NH Land and Community Heritage Investment Program (LCHIP) to help us continue to fund condition assessments on historic buildings across our state.

The money will be distributed to applying nonprofits and municipalities hoping to better understand historic building needs before applying for larger bricks and mortar grants. Since 2010, we have granted 43 condition assessments; these have propelled groups in diverse places like Canaan, Portsmouth, Middleton, Newbury, Keene, Rye, and Haverhill develop "road maps" to successful preservation projects. The matching block grants, which range from $1,000 to $4,500, fund teams of architectural historians, preservation contractors, and/or architects to analyze a building's architectural evolution and pressing maintenance needs. 

The Wentworth Congregational Church received a condition assessment grant to understand structural issues in their basement and timber frame, earlier in 2017. 

The Wentworth Congregational Church received a condition assessment grant to understand structural issues in their basement and timber frame, earlier in 2017. 

“The planning money is often hard for groups at the start of a project to secure, and it is critical to getting what are often very complicated projects off to a good start,” said Jennifer Goodman, our executive director. A strong planning document often saves project leaders time and money in the long run. 

Other LCHIP historic resource recipients include twenty-nine buildings representing nearly two centuries of New Hampshire history, from 1769 to 1967.  Eight of the historic properties had been listed to the Preservation Alliance’s Seven to Save list of endangered properties, and three have received planning grants from the organization.  The new group of grant winners includes two rare remaining railroad buildings (Bartlett Roundhouse and Wolfeboro Freight Shed) and the first monument in the country dedicated to women’s service in both military and civilian roles (at Cathedral of the Pines, Rindge).  

The Preservation Alliance is very grateful to the N.H. Legislature and Governor for their support of LCHIP, a catalytic program that supports good jobs and keeps money circulating in local economies. 

Is your group interested in starting a preservation project? Call us today to figure out how to begin.